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Mostly photography and some other musings.

Posts tagged photographers

Such a great and inspiring photographer.

I saw an exhibition with some of his pictures, some time ago, in London, at the Photographer’s Gallery. Pictures of ordinary things, mundane scenes of his life and places, things that could pass inadvertently to anyone else but him. The proof that you don’t really need fancy trips to remote and exotic places to find beauty. ¬†Good weekend everyone! ūüôā

Interesting bits of an interview to this famous photographer:

If you want to know more about him, I recommend watching the documentary film “McCullin”. I saw it a few months ago on BBC. It is amazing what this person has seen and lived. Most of us would have ended completely mad. Here is a review of this film¬†from The Guardian. ¬†And this post explains a lot more about his photography. Is interesting how he has moved from “war photographer”, a term he doesn’t like at all, to only make pictures of UK landscapes. It might sound like his very own personal way of retirement but still working on his passion.

+ high-res version

Some beach pictures taken here in UK. From top to bottom, and from full colour to black and white: Felixtowe, Hunstanston, and Whitby. The last one is not a beach, strictly speaking, but I liked the landscape. I still know very little about this country’s geography, but I find the variety of coastlines quite interesting. And the coast here is close to any place. I recently knew about this Sea Change project and I found it fascinating. Photographer Michael Marten has¬†travelled¬†the entire¬†British¬†coast, taking pictures of places where the differences between low and high tides are dramatic. The pictures are great. The seascape/landscape changes completely in a matter of hours. The entire project took 8 years to make.

If you¬†are planning¬†on doing a similar project, areas in¬†reddish¬†colours in this map are the ones with highest tides. ¬†It’s interesting to see how in the middle of the ocean there is almost no variation in the sea level. And not all the coastal areas behave the same. I wonder which area seems¬†interesting¬†for a next sea change project? ūüėČ

Seen on twitter, I should have read a bit about this photographer.¬†What do composition rules¬†mean to you? Do you know about them? Do you need them? Are they useful to you? Do you break them? Or you just¬†don’t¬†care…

I recently watched “Anton Corbijn Inside Out” documentary. I found it particularly fascinating. For sure you have seen some of his famous photographs. If you ever have had an album from Joy division, U2, Rem, Nirvana, or Depeche mode, to name only a few, you have seen one.¬†They are usually high contrast black and white, and in some cases with cross processed film colours. Portraits of famous bands, with dramatic backgrounds.

In this documentary he talks about why he photographs music bands, and how that helped him to overcome his¬†difficulties¬†to relate to people. How his relationship with his family made him like he is now. Some aspects of his photography are discussed also, like the use of old film cameras to this date and his innate ability to see compositional aspects in an image, a thing that normal people learning about photography like me will struggle forever… ūüôā The documentary¬†goes¬†quite intimate, and at some point it looks almost like a filmed therapy session. There are some nice parts where people who has been photographed by him praise his job in some or another way. And the guy seems incredibly humble.

After watching this, I decided to have a look at his latest film, “The American”. He was the director. Critics have called this one an “anti Bond” film. People was expecting ¬†a more action packed kind of film, and it is not. It’s rather¬†introspective.

Here, the Metacritic reviews score for “The American”, and here is¬†interview with him.